Staff- a valuable source of information on mentoring relationship

2017 12 13

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This research article focus on  the coordinating staff who interact on regular basis with mentors and mentees and whom rarely are used as informants but can be a valuable source of information on mentoring relationship.
But also give a more nuanced understanding of the complexity of youth mentoring relationships.

It reports a relationship quality from nine mentor-mentee dyads in a New Zealand school-based mentoring program, as well as reports from the program staff who supervised them.

Distal and experiential perspectives of relationship quality from mentors, mentees, and program staff in a school-based youth mentoring program
by Hilary Dutton, Kelsey L. Deane, Pat Bullen

Wise intervention

2017 12 08

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In a by article by Jean E Rhodes she is writing: …those with mentors are more likely to graduate from high school, attend college, and obtain a Bachelor’s degree (Raposa, et al., 2017; Hagler et al., 2017; Christiansen, et al., 2017).

Read more here:

Mentoring for first generation Immigrant Refugee Youth

2017 11 19
About 50 people attended a peaceful vigil in solidarity with refugees held outside the immigration detention centre on Camp Road, Broadmeadows in Melbourne's northern suburbs. The protest was called by the Refugee Action Collective of Victoria with less than 2 days notice as two refugees inside are on hunger strike. One Iranian man, aged 33 has been on a hunger strike for 9 days after his second rejection. He has been detained for 16 months. A second Iranian man 32, was given refugee status five months ago and is awaiting security clearance. Both men have not received proper medical assistance. There was a substantial police presence in front of the main gate, and in the surrounding area including the dog squad. The protest was peaceful with speakers, music and chants of "Freedom", "Azadi". Hundreds of helium filled balloons raised a banner above the crowd and flew across the gate, before first catching on a fence, and then the balloons getting snagged in a tree. Candles were lit spelling out "SOS". One of the Iranian inmates telephoned out and thanked the crowd for their support - knowing we were outside gives encouragement and energy to the refugees detained inside. 2012 marks the 20th anniversary since the introduction of mandatory detention in Australia.

By Ashmeet K. Oberoi, University of Miami, Dec. 2016

This review examines research on mentoring for first-generation immigrant and refugee youth and is organized around four aspects of mentoring for these youth—its documented effectiveness, factors conditioning effectiveness, intervening processes for linking mentoring to outcomes, and the extent of reach and engagement and the quality of implementation of mentoring programs.

Read more here

How to Measure the Long-term Outcome?

2017 11 16

Wie wirkts langfristig?

Master thesis by Verena Kofler (in German)

Abstract
Social programs have to deal increasingly with their effects and are required to prove them. The aspect of long-term effects is often neglected. The present study investigated the question of how short- and long-term outcomes can be measured by an impact assessment on the mentoring program ‘Nightingale’, focusing on two of its main objectives: the increase of the educational motivation and the strengthening of self-esteem. A research design has been developed, which is able to show short and long-term changes (outcomes) using a quasi- experiment design and the double-difference method. By involving a comparison group, it allows the outcomes to be causally linked to the program. This non-memory-based approach takes into account both intended and non-intended personality-oriented outcomes. With the ‘five-factor model’ (Bleidorn and Ostendorf 2009) and the ‘self-value scale’ (Schütz and Selling 2006), established instruments were chosen that correspond to the scientific main quality criteria. This research design has then been discussed with relevant stakeholders on acceptance and practicability, based on qualitative, partially structured expert interviews. Information resulting from the interviews were extended with selected data deriving from analysis of current evaluations of ‘Nightingale’. Thereby both, the acceptance and the feasibility of the research design, could (conditionally) be confirmed. The work presents the possibilities and limitations regarding planning and hypothetical implementation of a long-term impact analysis in the field of social economy
Read more 

2017 09 19

2014-12-28 11.31.21
Effects of a School-Based Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on Self-Esteem Levels and Processes: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

Naida Silverthorn, David L. DuBois, Kendra M. Lewis, Amanda Reed, Niloofar Bavarian, Joseph Day, Peter Ji, Alan C. Acock, Samuel Vuchinich, and Brian R. Flay

This study evaluated effects of Positive Action (PA), a school-based social-emotional and character development program, on self-esteem levels and processes among minority, low-income, urban youth.

The result shows that students in PA schools had more favorable change and endpoint scores on indices of self-esteem in the domains of peer and school and use of both adaptive and (to a lesser extent) maladaptive processes for developing and maintaining self-esteem.  Read more click here

2017 06 24

rejkjavik HDR kopia

Do youth mentoring programs change the perspective and improve the life opportunities of at-risk youth?
By Núria Rodrígues Planas, Germany

Positive but modest effects of mentoring was found, especially for females, the most disadvantaged or at-risk youths. The results  however vary depending on the characteristic of the individuals involved and the quality of the relationships formed between mentors and mentees. So the researcher ask: Do the short-term changes generated by mentoring programs persist, or do they fade over time? Do they translate into longer-term payoffs, as measured by different life achievements?

 

2017 04 27

olikfärgade flaskor

An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of Long-Term Mentoring Relationships from the Youth Perspective

By Kevin Richard Jones, Portland State University (2016)

When mentoring programs are well-designed and well-implemented, young people can experience positive gains in a number of social, emotional, behavioral, and educational areas. But the lack of participant voice in mentoring research suggests that an important source of empirical and interpretive information is unavailable to the field in the process of designing, implementing, and researching mentoring programs.

This study used interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) to explore how youth participants in the Friends of the Children (FOTC) mentoring program experience and understand their long-term mentoring relationships.

Interesting? Read more here 

Research

2017 04 27

avslutningsdag 2015 017Motivation by Positive or Negative Role Models: Regulatory Focus Determines Who Will Best Inspire Us

By Penelope Lockwood, University of Toronto
and Christian H. Jordan and Ziva Kunda, University of Waterloo

These researcher demonstrated that individuals are motivated by role models who encourage their own/different concerns.
Promotion-focused individuals, who favor a strategy of pursuing desirable outcomes and where participants’ academic motivation was increased by goal matching role models but decreased by goal congruent role models.
Read more here


Interesting article about the effect of mentoring
avslutningsdag 2015 038

Professor Jean Rhodes, (University of Massachusetts,Boston)  one leading experts on mentoring sais: if you talk to successful people about what made a difference in your lives, “it often comes down to the involvement of a caring adult over time and during critical moments,”, Mentoring sometimes involves helping you “figure out what you want to do with your life … who are the people who will help you get there … and how do you connect with them.”Rhodes has worked with a team of other psychologists and social scientists on a meta-analysis of 73 mentoring programs aimed at children and adolescents across the Canada. Read more about it here

A new  book about mentoring called “Critical mentoring”. Click here to read more.

New research – An ecological perspective of mentor satisfaction

2016 10 26

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An Ecological Perspective Of Mentor Satisfaction With Their Youth Mentoring Relationsships
By Todd, & Sanchez 2016

Abstract:
Research shows the benefits of mentoring in promoting positive youth development. Yet less is known about mentors and what predicts mentor satisfaction. Such knowledge is vital to understanding how to recruit and retain adult mentors for youth. Thus, in the current study, we examine mentors as embedded in a social ecology of relationships, such as relationships with their mentee, mentee’s family, and mentoring organization they volunteer with. We use data from 247 mentors to test how each of these relationships (mentor with the mentee, mentee’s family, and mentoring organization) independently and interactively predict mentor satisfaction. Findings indicate that all relationships are unique predictors of mentor satisfaction, and that relationships with the mentee’s family and mentors’ mentoring organization interact in predicting mentor satisfaction. Overall, considering multiple relationships shows how various dimensions of the social ecology uniquely and interactively predict mentor satisfaction. Limitations and implications for mentoring practice are discussed.

suffrinetal2016

New Study by Nightingale Colleague

2015 12 17

A study that was recently carried out by our Nightingale colleague Jordi Feu and published in an academic journal (2015): Children and Youth Services Review: How an intervention project contributes to social inclusion of adolescents and young people of foreign origin

The article presents the results of the impact study of the Nightingale Project, in Girona. More than one hundred mentoring pairs (mentor and mentee) that took part in the intervention project were administered a questionnaire (N = 58). This same questionnaire was also given to a group of adolescents with the same profile but who did not participate in the project (N = 128) and who were treated as a control group. After six months of intervention the results show that students who participate in mentoring learn the language faster, create broader and more diverse networks of friends in school, develop higher educational aspirations and expectations, are better acquainted with the reception context (municipality they live in), and improve standards of self-confidence and self-esteem, among other characteristics. Read more by clicking here and download the article.