2017 09 19

2014-12-28 11.31.21
Effects of a School-Based Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on Self-Esteem Levels and Processes: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

Naida Silverthorn, David L. DuBois, Kendra M. Lewis, Amanda Reed, Niloofar Bavarian, Joseph Day, Peter Ji, Alan C. Acock, Samuel Vuchinich, and Brian R. Flay

This study evaluated effects of Positive Action (PA), a school-based social-emotional and character development program, on self-esteem levels and processes among minority, low-income, urban youth.

The result shows that students in PA schools had more favorable change and endpoint scores on indices of self-esteem in the domains of peer and school and use of both adaptive and (to a lesser extent) maladaptive processes for developing and maintaining self-esteem.  Read more click here

2017 06 24

rejkjavik HDR kopia

Do youth mentoring programs change the perspective and improve the life opportunities of at-risk youth?
By Núria Rodrígues Planas, Germany

Positive but modest effects of mentoring was found, especially for females, the most disadvantaged or at-risk youths. The results  however vary depending on the characteristic of the individuals involved and the quality of the relationships formed between mentors and mentees. So the researcher ask: Do the short-term changes generated by mentoring programs persist, or do they fade over time? Do they translate into longer-term payoffs, as measured by different life achievements?

 

2017 04 27

olikfärgade flaskor

An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis of Long-Term Mentoring Relationships from the Youth Perspective

By Kevin Richard Jones, Portland State University (2016)

When mentoring programs are well-designed and well-implemented, young people can experience positive gains in a number of social, emotional, behavioral, and educational areas. But the lack of participant voice in mentoring research suggests that an important source of empirical and interpretive information is unavailable to the field in the process of designing, implementing, and researching mentoring programs.

This study used interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) to explore how youth participants in the Friends of the Children (FOTC) mentoring program experience and understand their long-term mentoring relationships.

Interesting? Read more here 

Research

2017 04 27

avslutningsdag 2015 017Motivation by Positive or Negative Role Models: Regulatory Focus Determines Who Will Best Inspire Us

By Penelope Lockwood, University of Toronto
and Christian H. Jordan and Ziva Kunda, University of Waterloo

These researcher demonstrated that individuals are motivated by role models who encourage their own/different concerns.
Promotion-focused individuals, who favor a strategy of pursuing desirable outcomes and where participants’ academic motivation was increased by goal matching role models but decreased by goal congruent role models.
Read more here


Interesting article about the effect of mentoring
avslutningsdag 2015 038

Professor Jean Rhodes, (University of Massachusetts,Boston)  one leading experts on mentoring sais: if you talk to successful people about what made a difference in your lives, “it often comes down to the involvement of a caring adult over time and during critical moments,”, Mentoring sometimes involves helping you “figure out what you want to do with your life … who are the people who will help you get there … and how do you connect with them.”Rhodes has worked with a team of other psychologists and social scientists on a meta-analysis of 73 mentoring programs aimed at children and adolescents across the Canada. Read more about it here

A new  book about mentoring called “Critical mentoring”. Click here to read more.

New research – An ecological perspective of mentor satisfaction

2016 10 26

18344328294_d8aa2c6815_o

An Ecological Perspective Of Mentor Satisfaction With Their Youth Mentoring Relationsships
By Todd, & Sanchez 2016

Abstract:
Research shows the benefits of mentoring in promoting positive youth development. Yet less is known about mentors and what predicts mentor satisfaction. Such knowledge is vital to understanding how to recruit and retain adult mentors for youth. Thus, in the current study, we examine mentors as embedded in a social ecology of relationships, such as relationships with their mentee, mentee’s family, and mentoring organization they volunteer with. We use data from 247 mentors to test how each of these relationships (mentor with the mentee, mentee’s family, and mentoring organization) independently and interactively predict mentor satisfaction. Findings indicate that all relationships are unique predictors of mentor satisfaction, and that relationships with the mentee’s family and mentors’ mentoring organization interact in predicting mentor satisfaction. Overall, considering multiple relationships shows how various dimensions of the social ecology uniquely and interactively predict mentor satisfaction. Limitations and implications for mentoring practice are discussed.

suffrinetal2016

New Study by Nightingale Colleague

2015 12 17

A study that was recently carried out by our Nightingale colleague Jordi Feu and published in an academic journal (2015): Children and Youth Services Review: How an intervention project contributes to social inclusion of adolescents and young people of foreign origin

The article presents the results of the impact study of the Nightingale Project, in Girona. More than one hundred mentoring pairs (mentor and mentee) that took part in the intervention project were administered a questionnaire (N = 58). This same questionnaire was also given to a group of adolescents with the same profile but who did not participate in the project (N = 128) and who were treated as a control group. After six months of intervention the results show that students who participate in mentoring learn the language faster, create broader and more diverse networks of friends in school, develop higher educational aspirations and expectations, are better acquainted with the reception context (municipality they live in), and improve standards of self-confidence and self-esteem, among other characteristics. Read more by clicking here and download the article.

Research

2015 09 13

305806118_f7d385de29_o

In 2013 a study was made called “The Role of Risk: Mentoring Experiences and Outcomes for Youth with Varying Risk Profiles,” who examined mentoring program relationships, experiences and benefits for higher-risk youth.

Among the findings there are some positive results.

  • The strongest program benefit, and most consistent across risk groups, was a reduction in depressive symptoms — a particularly noteworthy finding given that almost one in four youth reported worrisome levels of these symptoms at baseline.
  • Findings also suggested gains in social acceptance, academic attitudes and grades.
  • In addition to benefits in specific domains, mentored youth also experienced gains in a greater number of outcomes than youth in the comparison group.

The study also confirmed that mentoring programs could be beneficial for youth with a broad range of backgrounds and characteristics. If training and support was tailored it has the potential to produce an even stronger benefits.

The study involved more than 1,300 youth, drawn from seven mentoring programs in USA.

Click here to view the full study

Click here to view the Executive Summary

New research paper “Breaking Bad” by Karen Zilberstein

2015 02 09

näktergalen girls statue1

Please download a new research paper by Karen Zilberstein entitled Breaking Bad here.

ABSTRACT
This paper consist of mentoring relationship closures and consider how the rich empirical and theoretical literature on attachment can inform mentoring programme practice and possibly help to prevent premature and poorly relationship endings. It is also about endings in youth mentoring relationships, articulate an attachment perspective on mentoring relationships and their endings and offer recommendations informed by these literatures for how mentoring programmes can promote positive closure when relationships come to an end.

New research report from University of Teacher Education Zug ZB

2014 11 02

New research Report from University of teacher Education Zug ZB institute for Internationals Cooperation in Education- Program Evaluation by Miriam Aegerter, Bruno Leutwyler and Claudia Meierhans.

It can be downloaded as a pdf here.

“Researching the Impact of Student Mentoring in the Community” by Alethea Melling, Ridwanah Gurjee

2014 06 25

Examining commitment and relational maintenance in formal youth  mentoring relationships

Vi tar ihand jpg

This study by Patricia E. Gettings and Steven R. Wilson from Purdue University, USA utilizes a social exchange perspective to examine mentors’ reported commitment and relational maintenance in formal youth mentoring relationships. One
hundred and forty-five adult mentors from four mentoring programs completed surveys about aspects of their current youth mentoring relationship.

Read more here

Please click this link to download a PDF of a study on mentoring and read below for more information on the study.

4562078443_f3338b56d0

Mentoring- An invisible gift
Above you will find a very interesting paper “Researching the Impact of Student Mentoring in the Community” by Alethea Melling, Ridwanah Gurjee. It explores the impact of mentoring relationships on student mentors at the University of Central Lancashire in the UK and looks at student experiences, personal and professional development from mentoring over one academic year. As such the results of this study are also valuable to us.

It includes both qualitative and quantitative methods in order to draw comparisons and detailed insight into the interactions of all parties involved in the mentoring programme, including mentors, mentees and the community organization.

The findings is that mentors receive an ‘invisible gift’ that is not formally acknowledged. The ‘gift’ is manifested as key skills for lifelong learning and employability. Also, the findings highlighted that mentoring has a significant impact on the mentee regarding enhancing confidence, self esteem, skill development and engagement in pro-social behavior; thus, identifying ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ outcomes.
This research also concludes that the mentoring process should utilize a ‘mentee-centered approach.’ A balance of both ‘instrumental and ‘expressive’ processes in order to support, encourage and guide mentees to achieve their full potential.